Tim Longhurst's Blog
970

Entries Tagged as 'Corporate craziness'

Whopperlust invites Americans to trade their attention, dignity for hamburgers

July 4th, 2011 · No Comments

Love creativity? This is a great example of creative advertising. Burger King in the US set up their own “Whopper” interactive TV channel where you are paid in burgers to sit and watch a whopper. The longer you watch, the more free burgers you get. (5 minutes = 1 whopper).

Anyone who’s seen The Meatrix (highly recommended) will know why I avoid fast food burgers altogether, but it’s still clever marketing.

To see this TV channel in action, here’s a guy trying to get a free burger (offensive language warning) skip to 2min20sec to see how the channel can tell if you’re still paying attention.

The audience for this unique campaign isn’t just people who watch Direct TV channel 111, but the various audiences that will extend the campaign through social media and word of mouth. Definitely an example for anyone looking for clues about the future of advertising & marketing… If you’re going to be boring with a standard old ‘product as hero’ shot… Do it in a creative and entertaining way!

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , ,

Category: Communication and connection · Corporate craziness · Future

Heading to New York and DC for coffee

March 6th, 2009 · 5 Comments

Today I’m heading to NYC and DC for a two week trip, and I’m hoping you can help me make the most of it. Sure, I’ve got some work to do while I’m over there – meetings planned for my work with GetUp etc., but I want to squeeze the most out of my trip. I’m attempting to ‘crowd source’ part of my itinerary by asking my network to advise me on who I should with over the next fortnight.

In short, I’m going to America to have a few coffees with interesting people – and I’d like you to help make sure I fall in with the right crowd.

To give you a hint of what I’m looking for, I am passionate about innovation. To me, answering the question “Is there a better way?” is one of the most important tasks we have as humans. I’m dedicating this trip to meeting with innovators – people who dare to seek the better ways of doing things –  in the fields of media, communication, activism, business – actually, really, any field at all!

But maybe ‘innovators’ is the wrong word? Maybe change-agents, activists, philosophers, thought-leaders, speakers, futurists, rabble-rousers, culture jammers or thinkers would be better words?

If you know (or know of) someone based in NYC or DC that you admire/love/respect/think would be cool to meet, recommend them! I’d like you to please name them in the comments section below, forward this post to them, or email me – tim @ timlonghurst.com.

I’ve got a great feeling about this trip. Naturally, even if you’re nowhere near NYC/DC you’ll be included – I’ll save the best quotes and anecdotes from all of this fun for the blog – I promise! Thanks in advance for your help, Tim

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , ,

Category: Communication and connection · Corporate craziness · culture jamming · Guide to better living

Henderson & Horning – a lesson in stakeholder relations

August 14th, 2008 · 3 Comments

A woman’s legs in a pair of fishnet stockings is being used to show how out of touch the management/marketing teams over at Henderson and Horning really are.

Well, the Henderson Horning team (a real estate company, apparently) no doubt think they’ve got their market just right, but if Wade and Gavin are anything to go by, they’re out of line with their stakeholders…

A stakeholder is anyone who can have an impact on your brand’s value.

…And I reckon Wade and Gavin are putting a bit of a dent in Henderson Horning’s brand value at the moment, at least as far as that company’s presence in Google is concerned.

You see, when Wade and then Gavin documented the sexist nature of Hendersen & Horning’s marketing, and the management’s indifference to Wade’s original concerns, Google started giving their greivences a high priority in searches for the company’s name. You can click here to see how Henderson and Horning are fairing on Google. So what would potential customers or employees see if they searched for this company?

Sorry, what was I thinking? I should show you the advertisement in question:

Yeah, that’s right, a pair of legs in fishnet stockings, just at eye level in a Sydney street. Lord only knows why the guy’s got his shirt open and what any of this has to do with ‘massive parking’, but it’s not a particularly thoughtful piece of marketing.

So why don’t I show you my proposed ‘street level’ solution that I suggested to Wade… Can you see it?…

…That’s right… I’ve turned the office number into a “Sexist Advertising Complaints Line”… I thought that was a cute idea that the public would respond to. I guess time will tell if anyone gets out there and blu-tacks a piece of paper to the window… I’m in China right now, so sorry guys, it won’t be me.

Well, there’s a free lesson on protecting your brand and realising the power of stakeholders in the social media environment.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , ,

Category: Corporate craziness

How a sell-out olympics means rows of empty seats

August 12th, 2008 · 1 Comment

When people say the Olympics has “sold out”, what they may actually mean is that the Olympics are more about “selling out” to corporate sponsors than ensuring people actually see the games live…

There are a number of reasons that Olympic stadium seats are empty in these ‘sold out’ Olympics. Here is the reason I find the most compelling:

Sponsors, media rights holders and government officials aren’t using their tickets; or, they are using their tickets for only a portion of the allocated time (tickets secure the holder a seat for an entire ‘session’, which usually lasts several hours).

The Olympics cost sponsors, media rights holders, government officials and committees (IOC, national Olympic committees and sporting authorities) a lot of time and money, and part of their reward includes allocations of tickets.

So the question is, how do tickets that won’t be used get allocated efficiently now and at the next games? Part of the answer may come from Wimbledon, helpfully, the home of the 2012 Olympic games:

“Wimbledon operates a ticket resale system, with tickets surrendered during the day resold and the proceeds donated to charity.

When spectators decide to leave before the end of a day’s play, they are encouraged to place their ticket in special boxes located around the ground.

These tickets are then re-printed and sold at the resale kiosk, which opens mid to late afternoon.”

This is a positive Public Relations opportunity

Well that’s straight forward: Olympic sponsors / ticket holders could quickly register the tickets they won’t be using each day online… The organisation that releases the most amount of tickets through the system (and therefore raises the most money for charity) could receive some kind of recognition, as a way of rewarding organisations that would otherwise be leaving seats empty.

At these games, though, a more basic system can come into play – if sponsors have tickets they won’t be using, give them away! Just about anyone on the street would gladly receive the gift. It’s much more sporting than just letting a ticket go unused because you couldn’t find someone schmooze-worthy to take!

If you represent an Olympic sponsor (General Electric, Johnson and Johnson, Kodak, Lenovo, Manulife, McDonalds, Omega, Panasonic, Samsung, Visa, Sinopec, CNPC, China Mobile, Volkswagen, Adidas, Air China, PICC, State Grid…) and/or you’ve got an innovative method of ensuring ticket allocations are used, post it!

Zàijiàn! Tim

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Category: Corporate craziness

Hey Visa: Trashing a neighbourhood with your brand is not good marketing.

July 29th, 2008 · 10 Comments

Beijing’s “Nanluogu Xiang” Hutong (alley) is a bustling mix of stores, bars and eateries… A favourite of ex-pat’s and locals alike.

At night, the alley is illuminated by the lights from within the restaurants, street lamps and bright red Chinese lanterns.

But tonight, all of this has been washed out in a sea of tacky corporate badvertising.

Stand up and be counted, Visa. Everyone’s been talking about China’s effort to take on the air pollution, but what about Visa’s campaign to create visual pollution?

Here, in this picture, we see a man drilling a hole in a beautiful Beijing restaurant’s wall. Why is he doing this?

Oh, I see – this is why – he’s doing it for Visa! A credit card company…

And looky-here: there’s plenty where that one came from…

The alley I’m describing is narrow – it has room enough for one car to pass by and all the bikes and pedestrians have to scurry out if the way. To fill the alley with lightboxes for a credit card isn’t just tackey, it’s insulting to Chinese culture and offensive to visitors who expect to be able to enjoy Beijing’s charm without multinational’s trashing said charm for a perceived marketing benefit.

Personally, I think they’ve miscalculated. I can’t imagine getting ANY goodwill out of running roughshod over a small Chinese neighbourhood just because in ten days a bunch of rich foreigners will be showing up.

I’d love to know what Visa paid, who they paid the money to; whether the shopkeepers are getting remunerated for the loss of charm; and whether someone from Visa is going to be smart enough to literally pull the plug on this ghastly mistake.

If you’re a marketing rep from Visa and you’d like to respond, get in touch.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , ,

Category: Corporate craziness